Calendar December 27, 2018 13:35

uploaded image

 

I had been keeping a few sets of pipes in workshop storage since I began organ building. Those in the foreground of the photo above are a partial set from a vintage 4' harmonic flute rank. The pipes came from the same source I obtained the three sets of pipes I used in the first organ I built. Many of those pipes gifted to me then were damaged beyond repair because they were packaged and stored improperly by the church that originally owned them. Those who dismantled the organ unfortunately used bubble wrap. Packing straw like that which is used to store and ship wine bottles also properly cushions organ pipes when crated for storage or shipment.

In the background of the photo and mostly under packing straw is the front pipe set of a principal 2' rank I had made by a pipe maker in the Netherlands for a small organ I was going to build on spec when starting out. I got my first commission before I began building that spec organ, and these became archived material.

I really thought the stored pipes would not be of value to an organ I would build, but I held on to them anyway. Having the opportunity to deconstruct the work of Ernest M. Skinner by having the opportunity to play and research his firm's orchestral  Opus 892 at Northrop Auditorium on the University of Minnesota campus places this archived material in an altogether new frame of reference though. As I think about designing a new cabinet organ for client commission, I now believe the pipes could form part of that instrument in interesting and creative ways.

 

uploaded image

Posted December 27, 2018 13:35

Calendar December 21, 2018 13:09

uploaded image

 

A unique feature found in many of the larger Skinner instruments is a rank of open wood pipes with triangular cross section. With regular playing time on the Aeolian-Skinner Opus 892 at the University of Minnesota Northrop Auditorium, and having built wood pipes for my own instruments, I wanted to know what it would take to build a wood organ pipe with triangular cross section.

This blog entry introduces my triangular wood organ pipe project published in the story linked to below with additional entries to follow that explain various aspects of the project more in depth.

https://sway.office.com/ZvKUBTdDDJhO4FMn

Posted December 21, 2018 13:09

Calendar February 13, 2018 16:42

uploaded image

Most people who know me know that I am a pragmatic person. I build organs limited to five or six stops. To do so in a valid way requires not only good tonal and visual design, but good mechanical design as well. The organ is both significant parts art and engineering.

This blog entry introduces a story linked to below that I wrote to explain two ways in which computer technology assists my design process.

https://sway.com/byBsFDSfu6etpEb4

Posted February 13, 2018 16:42

Calendar February 7, 2018 17:23

uploaded image

I took some time when I first set up shop here in Minnesota to develop a design language that I describe here as influenced by the Grand Avenue, Macalester College area of St. Paul, one characterized by early-century, industrial-agricultural affluence. My studio work began to take on that influence which could be described by contrasting dark woods with light, and the use of mechanical joinery apparent in dovetail or box joined constructions.

I then set out to create a structural design architecture that would form the design foundation for a family of cabinet pipe organs. I talk some about that process in the following story linked to here.

https://sway.com/rME5JPhADExnq8s4

Posted February 7, 2018 17:23

Calendar January 27, 2018 15:25

uploaded image

Digital storytelling is a unique and compelling way to present an idea. I was introduced to the concept of digital storytelling at the University of Minnesota. I would describe the stories I write as photos backed up by words, rather than words backed up by photos.

I decided to first give digital storytelling a try by describing my professional journey as a pipe organ builder. I used a new Microsoft app to write the three autobiographical stories that described that journey, and then introduced them in this design blog entry.

http://stevepanizza.blogspot.com/2015/09/storytelling.html

Posted January 27, 2018 15:25

Calendar January 27, 2018 15:09

uploaded image

You cannot escape math and physics when designing a pipe organ. My engineering education and background lets me see important relationships between energy and sound, between structure and applied forces. Yet I consider my work to be historically referenced where to me it matters. I talk in this design blog entry about the methods I use to develop the tonal design of an organ that rely more on the work of the old masters rather than emperical relationiships.

http://stevepanizza.blogspot.com/2015/05/the-artisans-versus-academic.html

Posted January 27, 2018 15:09

Calendar January 27, 2018 09:15

uploaded image

I talked about workshop projects I do to expand my skill set outside the bounds of pipe organ building in my last entry. Some projects also provide surrogate opportunities to develop construction techniques relevant to cabinet organ building as I envision it.

One could describe my idea of pipe organ building as minimalist. I imagine that my minimalist approach could actually help a musician develop creative and innovative uses for an instrument that at first seems limited, yet is anything but.

I talk some about developing cabinet frame constructions and my thoughts about limitation here in this design blog entry.

http://stevepanizza.blogspot.com/2014/10/shelving-units-history-perspective-and.html

Posted January 27, 2018 09:15

Calendar January 27, 2018 08:39

uploaded image

I started the processes of designing a new organ about five years ago. I write about that here in this design blog entry on my approach to tonal design. I was thinking about building a small recital organ back then. The availability of my first organ may take me in any number of directions with the building of a new organ.

http://stevepanizza.blogspot.com/2013/09/tonal-design-then-and-now.html

Posted January 27, 2018 08:39

Calendar January 27, 2018 08:25

uploaded image

A church can often be an organization without individuals united by a common goal or purpose. No wonder then that I think about the design of a cabinet organ for a unique recital venue like an art gallery space for instance. The structural difference between an organ designed for church use and one designed for recital use is not all that different. The difference lies in tonal design as each are built for a different purpose.

Here I wrote a blog entry that took me back to an original idea I had when first starting out.

http://stevepanizza.blogspot.com/2013/08/hashtagging-design.html

Posted January 27, 2018 08:25

Calendar January 26, 2018 19:43

uploaded image

I write about the use of technology in this entry from my design blog that assisted me in the complex process of designing pipe groupings for organ case pipes. These are the pipes that you see laid out in some geometric form in the front of an organ case. I use examples from the first organ I built to describe the process and tools I developed to create a three-section front pipe grouping for the instrument.

 

http://stevepanizza.blogspot.com/2013/06/how-to-design-organ-case-pipes.html

Posted January 26, 2018 19:43

Calendar January 26, 2018 18:59

uploaded image

This entry is especially relevant as I wrote about the motivation behind the organ I built now made available by the closing of a church. I write elsewhere about how the instrument may actually provide material for a new instrument. This entry details how the organ itself is the result of repurposed material designed into what became the first instrument I built as an independent builder.

 

http://stevepanizza.blogspot.com/2013/06/reuse-and-repurpose.html

Posted January 26, 2018 18:59

RSS Feed RSS Feed

In addition to managing my evening and weekend organ building workshop, I also work at the University of Minnesota.

People at the University encouraged me to write about my thoughts and experiences regarding design and engineering as they specifically relate to the work I do in the shop, so I started a blog.

Here I include links to entries about design topics specifically related to pipe organ building.

Recent Blog Entries

Archive